Quilts Using Men’s Neckties

 

The Shirt

Last Fall I wrote a post about making quilts using men’s neckties. The subject had a lot of interest, so obviously there are a number of quilters who are interested in ways to use discarded neckties. Indeed, neckties are made of expensive, beautiful fabrics. I posted a link to a paper-pieced pattern for this 12-inch block called “Starched Shirt.” That link had an issue, so I am now posting a replacement link for simple templates for this block. You can find the pattern here: Starched Shirt PDF. Note the long pieces of the shirt front span onto a second page, so you will need to tape the pages together and cut out this template.

Shirt detail

 

There are three inset seams in the block. Don’t panic, they aren’t too difficult. Sew the sides of the shirt to each side of the tie. Then sew the neck piece to the tie section (seam 1), starting and stopping 1/4 inch from each end of the seam. Turn the left side of the neck piece and fit it to the upper left shirt collar and stitch (seam 2) from the tie to the top of the collar , and repeat for the other side (seam 3). Then do the same for each background pieces. Sew the small seam at the collar, starting and stopping 1/4 inch from each end of the seam (seam 4). Then turn the background to fit along the neck, and sew from the top of the collar to the top of the block (seam 5), and repeat for the section along the shoulder (seam 6). Be patient, and gently ease the fabric pieces into place. Leaving the 1/4 spaces at the ends of the short seams is important, as it allows you space to start your next seam.

While we are revisiting the subject, I thought I would share a few more photos of these creative projects using men’s neckties.

This quilt was made by Nancy Sturgeon. I love that she has not only incorporated shirting fabric into the design, but she has also used the label sewn to the back of the tie in her border design.

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Virginia Anderson has given these silk ties new life by using them in this beautiful Crown of Thorns block. This is an amazing use of color and she has done a great job of mixing a variety of fabric designs.

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This lovely quilt was a custom design done by Linda Gutherie McClelland. For those of you who have ties and need some help getting them into a quilt, you can find Linda on Etsy.

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I cannot provide the name of the maker of this quilt. If someone can provide the maker’s name, leave a comment and I will update this image. I love the use of the dark grey solid fabric between the tie fabrics in this quilt. It allows the use of a variety of fabric designs and colors, without it looking mismatched.

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I don’t have a maker’s name for this quilt, either. The ties are sewn together and cut into blocks, then separated by solid black strips which helps unify the design. The solid blocks also provide a place for the eye to stop and rest.

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This art quilt was exhibited at Quilt Expo Beaujolais in 2013. I love the movement created by the soft curve in the ties when they were sewn together.  The circle of appliqued ties on the surface helps reinforce the circular movement.

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I could hang this Christmas Tree skirt on the wall and look at it all day long! This custom tree skirt is made by Chicago Lost and Found. Each skirt uses over 250 neckties. Beautiful!

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This last piece of necktie inspiration comes from the website of Italian architecture firm Oreste Ruggiero. They do not identify the maker of this beautiful labyrinth style quilt, but it is a stunner. It appears to be an applique piece, and has such a calm, meditative quality to the design. Bellisimo.

Hopefully, these beautiful and inspiring quilts make you want to grab an armload of ties and a pair of scissors! So many options….

Until next time,

Joan